Check out what POPS for us in our work at Emory University.

Survey: Black youth twice as likely to prioritise fight against HIV/AIDS over same-sex marriage

sourcedumal:

not surprising considering the fact that HIV is a much more pertinent issue to their lives…

(Source: projectqueer)

1 day ago - 404

People With Down Syndrome Disrupt Screening Conference (June 6, 2003)

On May 19th, a group of people with Down’s Syndrome and their supporters disrupted the International Down Syndrome Screening Conference at Regents Collage in London. This is the first time people with Down’s Syndrome have made such a protest and is a major new step in the debate about genetics, eugenics and the rights of disabled people.

As a result of the protest, the conference organisers allowed Anya Souza to speak from the platform. Ms Souza, who is a trustee of the Down Syndrome Association, told the doctors that she opposes Down’s Syndrome screening and that people with Down’s Syndrome are people not medical problems. Her speech was warmly applauded by the conference delegates

The protesters consisted of three people with Down’s Syndrome, another disabled person with learning disabilities and their families and supporters. They had written to the conference organisers in advance and asked to speak, but were refused by the main organiser, Professor Howard Cuckle. It is unacceptable that doctors discuss better ways of preventing people with Down’s Syndrome being born, whilst excluding their voices from the debate. This runs directly counter to one of the main demands of disabled people: ‘Nothing about us without us’.

The protesters expect that their action will persuade the conference organisers to ensure a full debate at next years conference with proper representation of disabled people with learning difficulties. This should be the start of a national debate on prenatal screening.

In her speech, entitled ‘Everything you ever wanted to know about Down’s Syndrome… but never bothered to ask’, Anya Souza said: I can’t get rid of my Down’s Syndrome. But you can’t get rid of my happiness. You can’t get rid of the happiness I give others either. It’s doctors like you that want to test pregnant women and stop people like me being born. You can’t abort me now can you? You can’t kill me…sorry!

Together with my family and friends I have fought to prevent my separation from normal society. I have fought for my rights. I have the right to a job, to services when necessary, to a decent standard of living, to know about my medical problems, to speak my mind, to make choices about my friends, whether to have sex, and so on. To do this you have to be independent when you grow up and not get separated from society… I may have Down’s Syndrome, but I am a person first.

Kitty Gilbert, who also has Down’s Syndrome, said: ….. I enjoyed watching the conference although I was a bit scared of what the conference people were saying. I think screening pregnant mothers with Down’s Syndrome babies is wrong. They are wanting their offspring to be able to enjoy their world around them and have endless happiness. I for one gave my mum pride and joy and I will continue to do so. I think that we should be treated fairly and equally, not being getting rid off because there is so much more in life that we can do. We are what we are and ask our opinion.

LDOnline

I remember when this happened.  Nobody expected that people with Down syndrome could even have an opinion on genetic screening, even though they’re more affected by it than most people.  When they weren’t allowed to speak the regular way, they barged in and made sure people listened.

(via youneedacat)

This was in 2003. The eugenic state only continues to accelerate. This is such an important reminder to work to center the voices of people with Down Syndrome in my work on the rhetoric and ethics of selective abortion.

(via repetition-is-holy)

2damnfeisty:

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

Black Excellence

(Source: skulls-and-tea, via strugglingtobeheard)

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

image via NPR

(via marchoftigers)

16-year-old's eye donation rejected because he's gay

gaywrites:

When A.J. Betts, a 16-year-old from Iowa, died by suicide, his family saw to it that his organs were donated to those in need, per his wishes. 

A.J.’s liver, lungs, kidneys, and heart were accepted — in fact, his heart went to a 14-year-old boy. But of all things, his eyes were rejected because of an FDA policy barring men who have sex with men from donating tissue. A.J.’s mother could not confirm whether her son had been sexually active, and so his eyes couldn’t be accepted as donations.

“My initial feeling was just very angry because I couldn’t understand why my 16-year-old son’s eyes couldn’t be donated just because he was gay,” A.J.’s mother Sheryl Moore said.

Regulations established during the early days of the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. restrict gay men from donating certain types of tissue. A ban on blood donation, established in the ’80s, is also still in place for this demographic, despite a critical need for both organ transplants and blood transfusions.

“This is archaic, and it is just silly that people wouldn’t get the lifesaving assistance they need because of regulations that are 30 years old,” continued Moore, who hopes her son’s story will help inspire a policy change.

Talk about an outdated policy being used in the weirdest possible way. I hope A.J.’s family finds peace in knowing that some of his organs were used to help others, and that so many of us around the world are thinking of him and his ongoing generosity. 

(via elegantly-tasteless)

1 week ago - 830

Native Hawaiian death rates from cardiovascular disease are 44 percent higher than the U.S. average, 39 percent higher for cancers and 196 percent higher for Type 2 diabetes. This state of being is allowed to persist in part, I believe, because these statistics are only numbers. They may be startling, but symbols on a page can be ignored, concealed or filed away in the back of the mind to grapple with later. I have my own information to share.

My dad and his siblings were one-half Hawaiian, their parents each half as well. My uncle was the second of three brothers. Before the islands’ first foreign contact, in 1778, alcohol was unknown to these shores. If he were born three centuries ago, no drop of liquor would have passed his lips. But alcoholism had been hurting Native Hawaiians for over a century. In 2012, my uncle died of liver cancer in a hospital room in Honolulu, miles away from his home on Maui. Medical interventions were too little, too late.

My father was named Daryl Collins Kahahane. His Hawaiian name was Lani, a component of the name I received when I was born. Three hundred years ago, he would have eaten a Hawaiian diet. Meals would consist of taro, sweet potato, fish, bananas, and other traditional foods — a diet high in vitamins and low in fat. These foods would probably not have resulted in him suffering from heart disease or diabetes. He may not have had a heart attack in our front yard. Scar tissue would probably not have formed in his heart, staying with him for the handful of years to come. And he might not have died at the age of 63, while I was finishing up the spring semester of my sophomore year in college. But in 2013 — after decades of mayonnaise, spare ribs, root beer, and SPAM — we are far from the old days.

My grandmother, who still lives in Lahaina, was born 82 years ago just up Lahainaluna Road from the sugar plantation where my father was born. She saw two of her sons die before her, in the span of two years. The youngest of the three brothers survives, along with two daughters. These are statistics that we do not normally discuss. Forty percent of the family that she birthed, raised, and loved, has preceded her in passing. She has buried 67 percent of her sons, attended two-fifths of a potential five funerals at our church, Maria Lanakila.

But no number value can be put on her loss. There is no replacement for a son or a father.

Ciara Winona Kealohilani Kahahane

(Source: nitanahkohe)

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Fe Del Mundo
[x], [x], [x], [x]
Fe Del Mundo (1911-2011) was a Filipina pediatrician, and the first woman to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. (They mistook her gender on the application form, but her credentials were so good they decided not to send her back. She may also have been the first Asian to attend.)
As a child, she’d already decided she wanted to be a doctor for the poor - three of her eight siblings died when they were kids. After her medical studies, she returned home to the Philippines, only to be plunged into the devastation of the Japanese military occupation of World War Two.
She volunteered to care for kids in the internment camp and set up a hospital there, earning her the nickname “The Angel of San Tomás”. She ended up heading a new children’s hospital during the war, that later evolved into a full-scale medical centre.
After the war, she opened the country’s first pediatric hospital, did pioneering research into infectious diseases like dengue fever, advocated family planning (controversial due to her Catholicism) and invented a bamboo incubator to be used in rural villages. And she went on working as a pediatrician well into her nineties.
So don’t mess with women in STEM. There’s every chance they will outlive you.
Wikipedia on Fe Del Mundo

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Fe Del Mundo

[x], [x], [x], [x]

Fe Del Mundo (1911-2011) was a Filipina pediatrician, and the first woman to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. (They mistook her gender on the application form, but her credentials were so good they decided not to send her back. She may also have been the first Asian to attend.)

As a child, she’d already decided she wanted to be a doctor for the poor - three of her eight siblings died when they were kids. After her medical studies, she returned home to the Philippines, only to be plunged into the devastation of the Japanese military occupation of World War Two.

She volunteered to care for kids in the internment camp and set up a hospital there, earning her the nickname “The Angel of San Tomás”. She ended up heading a new children’s hospital during the war, that later evolved into a full-scale medical centre.

After the war, she opened the country’s first pediatric hospital, did pioneering research into infectious diseases like dengue fever, advocated family planning (controversial due to her Catholicism) and invented a bamboo incubator to be used in rural villages. And she went on working as a pediatrician well into her nineties.

So don’t mess with women in STEM. There’s every chance they will outlive you.

Wikipedia on Fe Del Mundo

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

image via NPR

(via misslocs)

[F]or the first several years the SAT was offered, males scored higher than females on the Math section but females achieved higher scores on the Verbal section. ETS policy-makers determined that the Verbal test needed to be “balanced” more in favor of males, and added questions pertaining to politics, business and sports to the Verbal portion. Since that time, males have outscored females on both the Math and Verbal sections. Dwyer notes that no similar effort has been made to “balance” the Math section, and concludes that, “It could be done, but it has not been, and I believe that probably an unconscious form of sexism underlies this pattern. When females show the superior performance, ‘balancing’ is required; when males show the superior performance, no adjustments are necessary.”

“Gender Bias in College Admissions Tests”, FairTest.org

And then people urge me everything is fine, of course it is, when you’re ignoring statistics that is.

(via cwnl)

Fun fact: SAT tests predict college performance pretty well for men, but they strongly underpredict college performance for women. http://spp.sagepub.com/content/early/2012/12/20/1948550612469038.abstract

HMMMM

(via brute-reason)

I think I’ve reblogged this before, but that study needs to be shared.

(via conjecturesandconversations)

(Source: aaabbbbbbiiieee, via nicocoer)